The Adventures of Now

exploring the mix of fun, fitness & health…as a diabetic


Leave a comment

Group Run: 6/2

                                     First Team for Kids group/long run! 

                                      

                                              There’s a lot of people! 

We had our first group/long run on Saturday – 5 miles was on the plan. 

Meet up time was at 8:30 on the west side …I’ve been spoiled in that my only other run group is a handful of blocks from my apartment and meets at 10am. I was booking it to get there on time – realizing it wasn’t too smart to get out of breath before even starting. 

It was misty out and I wondered if my first run with them would be also my first run in the rain. It ended up holding off and the sun was fully shining by the end (note to self: it is never too early/cloudy for sunscreen)

After the welcome speeches we all headed out for a quick warm up jog and then gathered to stretch. Calisthenics style. Um I can’t remember the last time I did high-knees, butt kickers & quick steps … high school sports?  It made me a little nervous of what was to come. But all of the coaches were awesome and getting everyone moving & laughing. I could see there were newbies, friends joining together and people reconnecting – it was pretty cool to have such a broad range. 

We broke off into beginner, intermediate & advance. 

I made sure to stop at every water fountain rest (anytime we passed one) plus I had a water bottle with me. I also hung out in the back of the pack (becoming a new trend) which I was ok with, I’m trying to keep it conservative while bouncing back from injuries and building my endurance up. We’re early to start training for the marathon as it is and I have plenty time to catch up. 

One coach even commented how 5 miles is a lot for the beginners for the first run and stressed that walking is good. That said, with all the water stops I’m a little surprised that I stayed under 12 min average pace. 

I was really impressed that the head coach remembered me from the open house fun run and the fact that I was Diabetic and took the time to check in with me. I didn’t get a chance to alert all of the coaches like I had done at the open house but I will be telling as many people as possible just so they’re aware. When the one of the beginner coaches did introduce himself to me at around mile 4 I put it right out there “hi, I’m Whitney, I’m Diabetic.” It’s a classy opening. I then proceeded to reassure  him  that I had 2 forms of ID (medical alert bracelet & roadID), a debit card (incase I need to buy sugar), my phone, chomps & my meter.

I do not travel lightly. 


Leave a comment

nnnnnNo!

The time a child procedure turned me into a 26 yro child:

I got tubes put in my ears today for the 5th time. It’s like chicken pox & getting your tonsils out – more likely to happen during childhood. Which it did… twice. And two more times in college.

But never in NYC….loud noisy NYC.

The first time I got it done in college I was a Freshman and was in for a bit of sensory shock. It was Easter weekend and I remember being frightened about returning to the dorm where my loving but very loud new BFFs were. By senior year I played up the adjustment memory and it ended up being no big deal.

This time I had it done right in the doctor’s office, as opposed to the hospital. It was less stressful than a dentist visit. Left ear done, no sweat. Only then I was hit with that wave of a low feeling where it hits hard & washes over you. As the doctor began on the right ear I interrupted him to grab glucose tablets. Then while he was making a note I grabbed my monitor – 98. That’s not low. Took the tablets anyways. The doctor was awesome, made sure I was ok, got me water & a cold compress. Even though Diabetes isn’t his field (and you’d be surprised – just because they’re a doctor doesn’t mean they really know about one of the biggest current epidemics) he was aware. I haven’t actually been taken care of during a low in quiet sometime & as I told him, I was glad it happened while I was sitting in a chair vs. walking around the city.

So what was up? Who knows, could have been my body’s reaction to the procedure as much as bloodsugars – stuff that “regular” people might encounter but I recognize as low symptoms.

Where does the child part come in?

After the appointment I had a meeting, which aside from wanting earmuffs for the subway, went well. I think it was the first time I wanted a cool big pair of headphones. Instead I just wore my iPhone ones to muffle some noise (that’s right NYC I wasn’t really listening to anything).

All was fine & dandy. Until I get home. And crashed. Suddenly I’m a kid….who desperately needs a nap, I’m exhausted .By late afternoon I found myself with my hands over my ears scowling at the refrigerator for humming and the airplane outside for flying. And saying “nnnnnNo!” To no one or anything in particular.

Much like this kid (he gets favorite points for switching gears at the mention of ice cream). 

I was supposed to go to a networking event but finally I realized that no one wants a cranky two-year old at a grown up function….especially when the two-year old is actually 26.

{pin}


1 Comment

Losing Count: Why I stopped Food Journaling

I first learned to read nutrition labels when I was old enough to read (or sometime in elementary school), if sugar was one of the first 3 ingredients it wasn’t going in the shopping cart. I started paying attention to the numbers over ingredient list around 5th grade…when I was first introduced to carb counting. Gushers, Goldfish, Chewy granola bars, Rice Krispies treats, Dunkaroos – give me a kids snack from the 90s and I can probably tell you the carbs, serving size…..and calories.

I’m still learning how to deal with a sweet tooth & cravings. Growing up I walked a fine line of restriction when it came to food. Forced to eat when I didn’t want to, not being able to eat when I did. Trading one thing for another, making compromises, testing what I could get away with, trying to fit in but knowing early on that I knew better than most grownups. Control. It’s a funny thing.

I kept loose food journals…of all sizes. Not necessarily diligent in keeping a proper record didn’t hide the fact that the information constantly consumed my thoughts. Is that what stock brokers feel like ? Planning their next move, debating risk & rewards, watching for the next big trend.

It was high school that calories became constantly counted. Again, never fully diligent in writing it down but constantly consuming my thoughts – providing fear, anxiousness and guilt. Not enough to cause drastic actions and under the guise of basic nutrition it led to binging of sorts more than anything, yo-yoing between guilt, rebellion and force.

I love my iPhone, yes one might call me dependent. It has apps! Apps that record your blood-sugars on the go, that can count your calories, give you nutrition information instantly…it’s endless! I’ve tried the looseit! app and it’s great.

But here’s why I had to let it go:

It was a battle. One low blood-sugar could ruin my entire day. And it would make me feel defeated. An unplanned granola bar could put me 120-200 calories past my daily allocation, 60 calories could be stolen by an unwanted juice-box. It was another reminder of restriction. Like the times when I wanted a snack and couldn’t have the carbs.

Or the times when my blood-sugars were normal or even high yet I wanted a snack by choice – the guilt of eating when I didn’t have to.

In adapting to a crazy work schedule, frequent meals at the office, NYC dining and the world of Healthy Living Blogs, I discovered both spectrums of “whole foods.” After struggling with the vulnerability of “open” food from restaurant ordering, I finally connected with the various mind sets of wholesome eating.

Growing up with a health nut father I learned early on about honey vs white sugar or the benefits of whole grains. But growing up in the 90s where I had buyers choice at my moms it was all about the pre measured & pre packaged snacks – my dad’s kitchen would throw me off and scared me.

Restriction is a difficult thing. If you don’t know what you’re missing you may be ok but once that door of temptation opens you become vulnerable. It goes hand in hand with food. As much as I try to control food, often through restriction, it strongly controls me. My health, my decisions, my actions.

So in letting go of the obsessive calculations, I’m aiming to focus on the things that I can enjoy – and truly enjoying them. Seeing food as an experience rather than a controller.

And where does that leave me now? I still hate grocery shopping, am constantly picking up packages to look at nutrition labels and read the latest news. Energy bars, granola bars and protein bars still make up a large part of my diet. But that may equally have something to do with my lack of cooking.

I’ll never be able to let go of planning, knowing and calculating – but now I’m trying to manage it in a more wholistic approach.

 ______

Related Links

I knew that just because every time I see a new product I instantly look at the nutrition label doesn’t mean that everyone else does. But only 9% look at calories and 1% (!!) look at other nutritional information ?? With the diet trends in America I would have expected more. | Fit Sugar

Calorie-Conscious without counting | Fit Sugar


Leave a comment

Dear blood-sugars: this is not how training is going to go.

96.

A perfect blood-sugar for a morning workout.

Not low but low enough to prevent a  nasty spike from activity & lack of insulin.

After yesterday’s lackluster start to training I was looking forward to a 3 mile redemption run – my first run for my first training plan for my first 1/2 marathon. Big deal folks. Ok not so much, but I wanted to really push myself for those 3 miles.

A treadmill run, my mind over body usually dictates the speed & incline and I set for increasing both every 1/2 mile.

Spoiler alert: DNF . #fail.

At 1.5 miles when I was just about to bring it up to under a 10 min mile (an old average that has been lurking in the shadows lately) when it started going down hill. By the time I neared 2 miles I knew it was over. It was all I could do to grab my stuff, wipe down the machine (holy sweatiness) and try not to crawl back to the locker room. I couldn’t tell if my blood-sugar was 40 or 400 (more like 140). On machine it was perfect, internally not so much. I had that dizzy/nauseousness thing going on.

The diabetes has made me super sensitive to how my body is feeling all my life – but here’s the thing: runners get dizzy & nauseous (not usually at 2 miles at 11/12 minute pace…) – I’m going to have to learn what’s the diabetes & what’s normal / push through it / needs to be addressed differently (looking at you dehydration) running trials.

That’s part of this “adventure” – some mega research to do / support team to build.

So stellar start right ? Well when I step away from my pity party I realize that there’s going to be sucky days made far suckier by the diabetes. But that’s partly why I’m doing this – for when I can punch those moments in the face with those awesome days & accomplishments.

{pin}

Plus I feel a teeny tiny bit better with the fact that my glutes are feeling yesterdays strength training (I did something right?) and I have soccer tonight, a little unconventional but I’ll pick up that last mile.

Not to mention this has only just begun …

____________________

Favorite Finds

Happy Peanut Butter Day!

I currently am completely out of nutbutter (the whole ruined grocery shopping thing yesterday). I know, it’s a miracle I haven’t started having withdrawals yet.

Here are 5 reasons to love peanut butter from Yum Sugar – I have a few  several  more I could add.